Sweet Matzah Brei – CYOB

Whether you make this dish sweet or savory, for breakfast or dessert, brei is an easy, healthy way to transform those leftover pieces of matzah.

Whether you make this dish sweet or savory, for breakfast or dessert, brei is an easy, healthy way to transform those leftover pieces of matzah.

Create Your Own Bite #22

1/2 Piece Matzah

1 Tablespoon Maple Grove Farms Sugar-Free Maple Syrup, Divided

1 Tablespoon Fat Free Half and Half

1 Tablespoon Egg White

Pinch of Kosher Salt

1/4 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon

1/4 Cup Chopped Bosc Pear and Gala Apple, Divided

Makes one serving.

Estimated Calories: 90

This evening marks the end of Passover, bringing to a close eight days of celebrating the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. The Passover Seder is the “main event” of this holiday, and features the thin, cracker-like matzah. This unleavened bread is a symbolic part of the passover tradition, and the flat, flavorless crisp invites many culinary transformations.

As a child, I would compete against my cousins to be the first to find the matzah hidden in one of my aunt’s forest green linens. While I always wanted to be the first to return to the dining room with the warm, toasted bundle, I was always disappointed by its contents. Good matzah has a toasted, slightly nutty flavor. But to my palate, it always tasted bland and papery.

Whether or not you look forward to the Passover Seder just to sink your teeth into one of these crispy breads, or if – like me – you’ve spent your Passovers trying to find the best condiment to bring to life the flat, thin sheet.

This year, my friend Amy introduced me to Matzah Brei – a traditional Jewish dish that is often served during breakfast. There are endless collections of sweet and savory matzah brie recipes – and Amy sent me a fantastic one for Maple Banana Matzah Brei. With healthy alternatives such as egg whites instead of the traditional egg, this version Amy presented transforms the fundamental softened matzah and egg into a great  sweet breakfast or dessert.

This version is a twist on Amy’s recipe; I use apple and pear instead of banana, and swapped applesauce for a little spread of pumpkin butter. Sugar-free maple syrup cut sugar and calories from the original, and ground cinnamon added an extra layer of flavor to the matzah.

To prepare, break the matzah into 1-2 inch sections, and place in a bowl. Fill the bowl with cold water until the matzah is just submerged. Allow to soak for 5-10 minutes.

Softening the matzah is key to turning this dry cracker into a sponge for flavor.

Softening the matzah is key to turning this dry cracker into a sponge for flavor.

Meanwhile, combine the egg with the salt, cinnamon, and half and half (or milk). I also threw the apple and pear into a pan with a little pat of butter to soften, cooking on medium heat while the matzah soaked.

Drain the matzah in a collander, and fold into the egg mixture. The pieces of matzah will continue to break up, so stir gently if you prefer bigger pieces.

Pour the mixture into a frying pan and allow to cook until the bottom is golden brown. Flip, and repeat. I divided my apples and pears, introducing the first half into the mix once it had been poured, and serving the rest over the final pancake.

With a drizzle of sugar free maple syrup as a final sweet touch, this matzah brei is sweet enough to serve for dessert, or filling enough to make for breakfast.

Until next year, I’m off to find more little ways to make sweet treats healthy, to reinvent classic dishes, and to eat some leftover Sweet Matzah Brei.

Here’s hoping you all had a happy and healthy holiday,

Melanie

Melanie

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